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Western Books, Part 3

Pyrrhonism: How the Ancient Greeks Reinvented Buddhism Adrian Kuzminski. Plymouth, U.K.: Lexington Books (a division of Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.), 2008.
Pyrrhonism is one of my favorite forms of emptiness teachings. It is very easy to understand and pretty easy to apply. It leads to a radical and profound state of not-knowing, while being peacefully in tune with life. Its founder Pyrrho (c. 360 BCE to 270 BCE) was an ancient Greek philosopher, and its most prolific expositor (Sextus Empiricus, c. 160–210 CE) was a physician.

One of my friends, Dawid Dahl, has been putting Pyrrhonism into practice. Here's what he says about it after about 18 months:

“I am Dawid.” It stopped making any sense. “The sky is up.” Likewise. “You will die.” What? “This is confusing.” What does all that even mean? The Pyrrhonist sceptical inquiry has helped lift from my shoulders all rigid conceptions as to what's real or not, and I've been experiencing a kind of peace that defies all description.

—Dawid Dahl